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Law professor find dusty 30 year old Apple Mac computer in working order in his family attic51m Updated Law professor find dusty 30 year old Apple Mac computer in working order in his family attic
A new york based law professor has found a dusty but fully functioning Apple Mac computer from the 1980s that has been sitting in his parents' attic for the last 30 years
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ZSL London Zoo shares animal X-rays1h 53m ZSL London Zoo shares animal X-rays
X-ray images reveal the inner workings of a variety of different species at ZSL London Zoo.
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Adorable baby turtle born albino and with its heart OUTSIDE its body has survived2h Adorable baby turtle born albino and with its heart OUTSIDE its body has survived
The tiny reptile, known as Hope, has such a rare condition that the condition has not yet been named in veterinary science. She was born albino and with her heart outside its protective chest wall.
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Beautiful images reveal ancient insects preserved in amber2h Beautiful images reveal ancient insects preserved in amber
Levon Bliss, from London and now based in Wiltshire, has published stunning images of insects preserved in amber dating back around 45 million years.
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UK government backs campaign for recycling bases in Pakistan2h UK government backs campaign for recycling bases in Pakistan
Scheme will match donations to NGO up to £2m to help reduce ocean plastic pollution A UK government-backed campaign to build recycling bases in Pakistan could raise millions of pounds to help reduce
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Becoming Greta: ‘Invisible Girl’ to Global Climate Activist, With Bumps Along the Way4h Updated Becoming Greta: ‘Invisible Girl’ to Global Climate Activist, With Bumps Along the Way
Like a modern-day Cassandra for the age of climate change, a Swedish girl's solitary act of civil disobedience has turned her into a mascot for climate action. But it's not easy being her.
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Bonaire: Where Coral and Cactus Thrive, and the Sea Soothes the Soul4h Bonaire: Where Coral and Cactus Thrive, and the Sea Soothes the Soul
In a dying reef world, the writer explores the underwater bliss of a little Caribbean island that is showing the world just how to save coral.
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Drones and big data: the next frontier in the fight against wildlife extinction7h Drones and big data: the next frontier in the fight against wildlife extinction
Emerging technologies are a boon for the work of conservation researchers, but not all universities are equipped for them Technology is playing an increasingly vital role in conservation and ecology research. Drones in particular hold huge potential in the fight to save the world’s remaining wildlife from extinction. With their help, researchers can now track wild animals through dense forests and monitor whales in vast oceans. The World Wildlife Fund for Nature estimates that
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Gove urged not to limit bottle deposit scheme to small containers8h Gove urged not to limit bottle deposit scheme to small containers
Environment secretary may target drinks of under 750ml in deposit return scheme Michael Gove has been urged not to water down plans to give people money back for recycling plastic bottles and cans, after consulting on whether to target small drink containers only. The environment secretary will confirm on Monday that he is pressing ahead with the new
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Embryo ‘Adoption’ Is Growing, but It’s Getting Tangled in the Abortion Debate12h Updated Embryo ‘Adoption’ Is Growing, but It’s Getting Tangled in the Abortion Debate
Many agencies that offer donated embryos, including most of those supported by federal grants, are affiliated with Christian or anti-abortion rights organizations.
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Clothing conscience13h Clothing conscience
How sustainable are your fashion habits? Take our quiz.
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Food waste bins should be collected weekly, says Michael Gove14h Food waste bins should be collected weekly, says Michael Gove
Drive to ‘reduce, reuse, recycle and cut waste’ could include plastic tax and deposit scheme Millions of homes could have their food waste bins collected weekly, if new proposals from the environment secretary are implemented in the wake of a government consultation on the UK’s waste system. Michael Gove’s proposed measures to ensure consistent recycling collections come after a number of councils cut the frequency of collections, leaving residents with overflowing bins.
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Trilobites: Birds of a Feather May Stick Together, but This Bird’s Foot Got Stuck in Amber16h Updated Trilobites: Birds of a Feather May Stick Together, but This Bird’s Foot Got Stuck in Amber
Researchers say the feathered specimen known as “Ugly Foot” or “Hobbit Foot” offers long-sought clues to the evolutionary path of birds.
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Smarter Driving: What’s on Your Car? Winter Tires, We Hope21h Updated Smarter Driving: What’s on Your Car? Winter Tires, We Hope
All-season tires can indeed be driven all year, but for maximum control and safety, there’s no substitute for tires that provide strong traction in snow. Here’s why you need them.
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Cooking Sunday roast causes indoor pollution ‘worse than Delhi’24h Cooking Sunday roast causes indoor pollution ‘worse than Delhi’
Scientists say roast meal can make household air dirtier than in sixth most polluted city
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Sharp rise in methane levels threatens world climate targets31h Sharp rise in methane levels threatens world climate targets
Experts warn that failure to act risks spike in global temperatures Dramatic rises in atmospheric methane are threatening to derail plans to hold global temperature rises to 2C, scientists have warned. In a paper published this month by the American Geophysical Union, researchers say sharp rises in levels of methane – which is a powerful greenhouse gas – have strengthened over the past four years. Urgent action is now required to halt further increases in methane in the atmosphere, to avoid triggering enhanced
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Virtual fences, robot workers, stacked crops: farming in 204031h Virtual fences, robot workers, stacked crops: farming in 2040
Population growth and climate change mean we need hi-tech to boost crops, says a new report It is 2040 and Britain’s green and pleasant countryside is populated by robots. We have vertical farms of leafy salads, fruit and vegetables, and livestock is protected by virtual fencing. Changing diets have seen a decline in meat consumption while new biotech production techniques not only help preserve crops but also make them more nutritious. This is the picture painted in a report from the National Farmers Union which attempts to sketch out what British food and farming will look like in 20 years’ time.
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