Back Science & Nature Monday, October 22, 2018
Search Sections 22 Oct
Close
Advertisement
Most of ‘Luzia,’ a 12,000-Year-Old Fossil, Is Recovered After Brazil Museum Fire9h Updated Most of ‘Luzia,’ a 12,000-Year-Old Fossil, Is Recovered After Brazil Museum Fire
The museum director said that 80 percent of the fossil had been found after a huge fire ripped through the National Museum last month.
 Like Reply
28,000 jobs at risk in north of England over low-carbon economy9h 28,000 jobs at risk in north of England over low-carbon economy
Thinktank says transition to low-carbon economy could result in ‘local deprivation’ As many as 28,000 jobs will be lost in the north of England in the next 12 years under the government’s drive towards a low-carbon economy, a thinktank has warned. The Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) said in its report that the region could be at the heart of a “clean energy revolution” – with a potential for 46,000 new green jobs – but instead faced economic decline under current plans.
 Like Reply
Michael Gove: plastic straws and cotton buds to be banned by October 20209h Michael Gove: plastic straws and cotton buds to be banned by October 2020
Environment secretary will announce plans to cut pollution and protect oceans Plastic straws, drink stirrers and cotton buds will be banned by October 2020 at the latest under government plans to cut pollution, Michael Gove is to announce. The environment secretary is due to say on Monday that a consultation will be launched on the proposals, citing the success of the 5p charge on single-use plastic bags, which led to an 86% drop in their use at major supermarkets.
 Like Reply
What’s at Stake in Brazil’s Election? The Future of the Amazon11h Updated What’s at Stake in Brazil’s Election? The Future of the Amazon
The next president of Brazil may shape the destiny of the Amazon, which is vital to reining in climate change. The stakes for the planet are huge.
 Like Reply
Migrants building £2.6bn windfarm paid fraction of minimum wage17h Migrants building £2.6bn windfarm paid fraction of minimum wage
Workers on Beatrice project in Scotland include unregulated migrants on under £5 an hour Among workers hired to build the £2.6bn Beatrice offshore windfarm in Scotland are unregulated migrants paid a fraction of the UK minimum wage, the Guardian can reveal. Offshore windfarming is one of the UK’s biggest growth industries, hailed by both the Conservatives and Labour as a priority for investment that will create thousands of jobs while also producing clean energy.
 Like Reply
Can YOU guess these animals from their bones?21h Can YOU guess these animals from their bones?
Oregon Zoo has released startling images of a range of animals from fish to flying mammals that captures the skeleton of various animals during a routine check-up.
 Like Reply
Five scientific predictions by Professor Stephen Hawking26h Five scientific predictions by Professor Stephen Hawking
From catastrophic climate change to alien invasion, the theoretical physicist’s thoughts about what might lie ahead were often far from optimistic In his recently published posthumous collection of articles and essays,
 Like Reply
Why rural Britain would be a sadder place without beautiful hares26h Why rural Britain would be a sadder place without beautiful hares
As myxomatosis spreads from rabbits, there are fears for the future of a species that holds a unique place in our affections I usually come across them at night, when I am driving home, or very early in the morning as I cycle across the Somerset Levels. Sometimes one runs down the road ahead, before darting under a gate and disappearing into the long grass. At other times, I glimpse what looks like a clod of earth in the middle of a field, which then surprises me by starting to move. And every once in a while I get a really good view, as I peer through a hedgerow and watch a hare feeding on wild grasses and meadow herbs. Hares are my favourite British mammal, so when I wrote a book about the natural history of my parish, I decided to call it
 Like Reply
Climate change is exacerbating world conflicts, says Red Cross president27h Climate change is exacerbating world conflicts, says Red Cross president
‘It’s obvious some of the violence we are observing … is directly linked to climate change,’ says Peter Maurer Climate change is already exacerbating domestic and international conflicts, and governments must take steps to ensure it does not get worse, the head of the International Committee of the Red Cross has said. Peter Maurer told Guardian Australia it was already making an impact and humanitarian organisations were having to factor it into their work far earlier than they were expecting.
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Monday, October 22, 2018

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept