Back Science & Nature Tuesday, June 12, 2018
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 Threatened dolphins recognise predatory killer whales from their alarming calls 12 Jun 8:56pm Updated Threatened dolphins recognise predatory killer whales from their alarming calls
Scientists at Duke University in North Carolina said the calls project the whales' intent and could warn potential victims of the killer in their midst.
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 Federal judge rules AT&T CAN move forward with its $85 billion purchase of Time Warner 12 Jun 8:53pm Updated Federal judge rules AT&T CAN move forward with its $85 billion purchase of Time Warner
The ruling brings an end to a six-week antitrust trial in which U.S. regulators argued that the $85 billion deal would give AT&T undue leverage against rival cable providers.
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 Instagram launches tool that lets you buy items by clicking stickers 12 Jun 7:23pm Instagram launches tool that lets you buy items by clicking stickers
Instagram just made it easier than ever for users to shop items directly from its app. Brands can now attach a sticker with a shopping bag to their Stories posts and users can tap to buy in the app.
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One in five UK mammals at risk of extinction 12 Jun 7:09pm One in five UK mammals at risk of extinction
The red squirrel, the wildcat, and the grey long-eared bat face severe threats, a study says.
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 Sea urchins see with their FEET: Eyeless animals use light-sensitive cells to find their way around  12 Jun 7:02pm Updated Sea urchins see with their FEET: Eyeless animals use light-sensitive cells to find their way around 
Sea urchins are the only animals that are known to see without having eyes. Researchers found their tentacle tube feet see well enough to fill basic needs.
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 Tesla lays off over 3,000 employees: CEO Elon Musk says firm is cutting up to 9% of its workforce 12 Jun 5:56pm Updated Tesla lays off over 3,000 employees: CEO Elon Musk says firm is cutting up to 9% of its workforce
Billionaire tech mogul Elon Musk announced that Tesla will axe about 9% of its staff. The move is part of a 'difficult, but necessary' reorganization at the company announced last month.
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 Instagram is down: Users discover they cannot access the site 12 Jun 5:33pm Instagram is down: Users discover they cannot access the site
Instagram has crashed for users all around the world, with the US East Coast and the UK hit especially hard by the outage. Many have found they are unable to refresh their feed, or log on at all.
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 Citibank warns it may slash 10,000 jobs as it replaces human workers 12 Jun 5:32pm Citibank warns it may slash 10,000 jobs as it replaces human workers
Citigroup's investment bank could automate as many as 10,000 jobs within the next five years, a chilling forecast warns. The bank would hire people in other areas such as sales and research.
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Birdwatch: garden warblers are losing their scrub habitat 12 Jun 4:30pm Birdwatch: garden warblers are losing their scrub habitat
Garden warblers in fact prefer thick scrub, which is dying out in our tidy countryside Some birds are very well named: such as the cuckoo, treecreeper and song thrush. Others, including Kentish plover, grey wagtail and garden warbler, are almost wilfully misleading.
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 Instagram is DOWN: Social media fury as users around the world discover they cannot access the site 12 Jun 3:51pm Updated Instagram is DOWN: Social media fury as users around the world discover they cannot access the site
Instagram has crashed for users all around the world, with the US East Coast and the UK hit especially hard by the outage. Many have found they are unable to refresh their feed, or log on at all.
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 The 18 things you may not realise Facebook knows about you 12 Jun 3:47pm Updated The 18 things you may not realise Facebook knows about you
From tracking the movements of your mouse to logging battery levels on your device, Facebook has revealed the ways it spies on its global users in a bumper document presented to Congress.
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 Citibank warns it may slash 10,000 jobs as it replaces human workers with robots in five years 12 Jun 3:41pm Citibank warns it may slash 10,000 jobs as it replaces human workers with robots in five years
Citigroup's investment bank could automate as many as 10,000 jobs within the next five years, a chilling forecast warns. The bank would hire people in other areas such as sales and research.
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Trilobites: Do You Know What Lightning Really Looks Like? 12 Jun 2:37pm Updated Trilobites: Do You Know What Lightning Really Looks Like?
Paintings by artists over centuries have consistently underestimated the number of root-like veins in a lightning strike, researchers found.
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 Two separate studies using AI tip Brazil to win World Cup 2018 based on simulations 12 Jun 2:29pm Two separate studies using AI tip Brazil to win World Cup 2018 based on simulations
Statisticians at the London headquarters of Goldman Sachs made the predictions after feeding an AI data on team strategy, the strengths and weaknesses of players and recent team results.
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Matter: A Crispr Conundrum: How Cells Fend Off Gene Editing 12 Jun 2:11pm Matter: A Crispr Conundrum: How Cells Fend Off Gene Editing
Scientists may need to bypass a cell’s cancer defenses in order to successfully edit its DNA. The finding raises questions about gene-editing advances.
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 Takeaway meals to be delivered by self-driving vans in Miami  12 Jun 1:40pm Updated Takeaway meals to be delivered by self-driving vans in Miami 
Ford is trialling a delivery service in Miami, Florida, using vans fitted with touchpad-activated storage lockers. The firm's vans will drop off your food, drinks and even household hardware.
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Cut out meat, pets and kids to save the Earth | Letters 12 Jun 1:13pm Cut out meat, pets and kids to save the Earth | Letters
Readers react to George Monbiot’s article on dropping meat and dairy, news about Sainsbury’s selling vegan ‘fake meats’ , and a report on meat being found in vegan and vegetarian mealsAlongside George Monbiot’s suggestion (
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 Camouflaged plants use the same tricks as animals to blend into their background 12 Jun 1:13pm Camouflaged plants use the same tricks as animals to blend into their background
Blending into the background helps plants protect themselves from predators, according to research led by Kunming Institute of Botany in China.
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How Universities Deal With Sexual Harassment Needs Sweeping Change, Panel Says 12 Jun 12:31pm Updated How Universities Deal With Sexual Harassment Needs Sweeping Change, Panel Says
Current policies and programs have failed overwhelmingly to address and prevent the problem, said a report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.
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 Deformed carp with a bird-shaped head is caught by Chinese anglers 12 Jun 12:09pm Updated Deformed carp with a bird-shaped head is caught by Chinese anglers
A bizarre-looking fish has made waves on the internet in China because of its unusual 'bird' head. People have compared the shaped of the fish's head to that of a pigeon, parrot or dolphin.
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 Uber Lite is a slimmed down version of the ride-hailing app designed for emerging markets  12 Jun 11:50am Uber Lite is a slimmed down version of the ride-hailing app designed for emerging markets 
The stripped back app, which launches in India today, requires just 5MB of free space to install – about the same as three selfies, and 176MB less than the standard Uber application.
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Top hat 12 Jun 11:18am Top hat
With the first 500mph runs now pushed back to mid-2019, there is more time to prepare the world's first supersonic car.
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 Is this what God looks like? E-fit images reveal the varying faces of the Christian deity 12 Jun 10:50am Updated Is this what God looks like? E-fit images reveal the varying faces of the Christian deity
A team of psychologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill created the imagined 'face of God' with the help of 511 American Christians.
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 Letters suggest Robert Burns was bipolar, academics say 12 Jun 10:47am Letters suggest Robert Burns was bipolar, academics say
Researchers from the University of Glasgow looked at blocks of letters written over nine years of Burns' life and used modern psychiatry methods to analyse his state of mind.
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 Takeaway meals and coffees could be delivered by self-driving vans being tested by Ford in Miami  12 Jun 10:45am Takeaway meals and coffees could be delivered by self-driving vans being tested by Ford in Miami 
Ford is trialling a delivery service in Miami, Florida, using vans fitted with touchpad-activated storage lockers. The firm's vans will drop off your food, drinks and even household hardware.
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Trump really has achieved a historic breakthrough – for the Kim dynasty | Jonathan Freedland 12 Jun 8:54am Trump really has achieved a historic breakthrough – for the Kim dynasty | Jonathan Freedland
With a shake of the hand, the US president has tightened Kim Jong-un’s grip over an enslaved nation – and got almost nothing in returnA useful way to test the
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 Mystery streak of light is spotted over Whidbey Island 12 Jun 8:52am Updated Mystery streak of light is spotted over Whidbey Island
A weather camera captured the peculiar light at 3:56 am PDT (6: 56 am ET/ 11:56 am BST) over Widbey Island, near a naval air station.
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 A secret missile launch? Mystery streak of light is spotted over Washington state island 12 Jun 6:58am Updated A secret missile launch? Mystery streak of light is spotted over Washington state island
A weather camera captured the peculiar light at 3:56 am PDT (6: 56 am ET/ 11:56 am BST) over Widbey Island, near a naval air station.
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 New Zealand is planning to kill every rat, stoat and possum in the country in a bid to save the kiwi 12 Jun 6:49am Updated New Zealand is planning to kill every rat, stoat and possum in the country in a bid to save the kiwi
The predators arrived on settlers’ ships hundreds of years ago, and are driving native New Zealand animals to extinction. Around 25 million birds are killed every year.
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 Goldman Sachs tips Brazil to win World Cup 2018 based on simulations 12 Jun 6:26am Updated Goldman Sachs tips Brazil to win World Cup 2018 based on simulations
Statisticians at the London headquarters of Goldman Sachs made the predictions after feeding an AI data on team strategy, the strengths and weaknesses of players and recent team results.
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 Netflix and YouTube all-but confirmed for Nintendo Switch at E3 12 Jun 6:18am Netflix and YouTube all-but confirmed for Nintendo Switch at E3
Nintendo could confirm the news today at its E3 press conference in Los Angeles today, with the keynote scheduled to begin at 9am PT (12pm ET/5pm BST).
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 Young people really ARE getting more stupid: IQs are falling 12 Jun 2:59am Young people really ARE getting more stupid: IQs are falling
Young people’s IQ scores have started to deteriorate after climbing steadily since Wold War Two, a new study has found, ending a trend that had seen IQs rise for the past 60 to 70 years.
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 YouTube bans videos from US firearms retailer Brownells 12 Jun 2:32am Updated YouTube bans videos from US firearms retailer Brownells
YouTube took down videos from Iowa-based firearms retailer Brownells over the weekend as part of its crackdown on gun-related clips.
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How universal basic income and rewilding could save the planet | Simon Lewis and Mark Maslin 12 Jun 2:00am How universal basic income and rewilding could save the planet | Simon Lewis and Mark Maslin
Are we doomed to societal collapse? Not if we break the mould of ever-greater production and consumption Enough concrete has been produced to cover the entire surface of the Earth in a layer two millimetres thick. Enough plastic has been manufactured to clingfilm it as well. We produce 4.8bn tonnes of our top five crops, plus 4.8 billion head of livestock, annually. There are 1.2bn motor vehicles, 2bn personal computers, and more mobile phones than the 7.5 billion people on Earth. The result of all this production and consumption is a chronic, escalating, many-sided environmental crisis. From rapid climate change to species extinctions to microplastics in every ocean, these impacts are now so large that many scientists have concluded that we have entered a new human-dominated geological period called the Anthropocene.
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How can climate policy stay on top of a growing mountain of data? 12 Jun 1:30am How can climate policy stay on top of a growing mountain of data?
Tracking all the relevant publications on climate change has become impossible. Climate science and policy need a new approach for an age of big literature When the lines between scientific facts, legitimate disagreements and uncertainties about climate change are being deliberately blurred – not least by world leaders like
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Windfarm experts publish no research and had no face-to-face meetings last year 12 Jun 1:17am Windfarm experts publish no research and had no face-to-face meetings last year
Committee was set up by former prime minister Tony Abbott to handle complaints about wind turbine noise
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The last bat: the mystery of Britain’s most solitary animal 12 Jun 1:00am The last bat: the mystery of Britain’s most solitary animal
In a dank Sussex tunnel, a solitary greater mouse-eared bat roosts each winter. Is he the only one left in Britain? By Patrick Barkham We cannot speak of its loneliness, but it must be Britain’s most solitary animal. For the last 16 years, every winter, a male greater mouse-eared bat has taken up residence 300 metres inside a disused and exceedingly damp railway tunnel in West Sussex. The greater mouse-eared bat has been all but extinct in this country for decades. This is the only remaining one we know of. The future of the species in Britain appears to rest with one long-lived and very distinctive individual. The greater mouse-eared bat is so large that observers who first discovered it in Britain likened one to a young rabbit hanging from a wall. In flight, its wings can stretch to nearly half a metre – an astonishing spectacle in a land where bats are generally closer to the size of the rodent that inspired their old name: flittermouse.
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Country diary: flowers emerge from the shingle 12 Jun 12:30am Country diary: flowers emerge from the shingle
Pagham Harbour, West Sussex:
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